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Paragliding Accindent (with Jaclyn St. Louis)

Episode #35
English Level: Upper intermediate
Accent: Canada

Into the Story Podcast - ep35 - Paragliding accident

About Jaclyn St. Louis' story

Jaclyn tells the story of a paragliding accident and its emotional impact on her life.

On this page, you’ll discover incredibly valuable learning materials and other goodies, to make the most of the podcast episode, and to take your English much further.

Quote of the episode

"The air was so cold, it froze the hair in my nose, and my eyelashes formed icicles, but then… I saw the most spectacular lights in the sky'".

Transcript

[00:00:27] Hi there. It’s your host Bree today, we’re going into this story. Of Jaclyn St. Louis. Jaclyn is from Calgary in Western Canada. And Calgary also happens to be my hometown, not coincidentally because Jaclyn is my big sister.

[00:01:12] Calgary is a great place for paragliding. It’s near the Rocky mountains. So there are many flying spots. There’s also a beautiful views and a really nice community of paragliders. on this episode,

[00:01:30] Jaclyn is going to tell us about the day she was in a paragliding accident.

[00:01:37] Jaclyn: Jaclyn, you’ve been in a midair collision. Listen to me. You’ve, we’ve practiced this,

[00:01:44] Bree: Jaclyn had been introduced to paragliding by her boyfriend at the time. Chris Mueller, a pro pilot with tons of experience. Today she shares the detailed technique of her flight. With Chris guiding her every step. Everything was going smoothly. Until suddenly it wasn’t.

[00:02:08] Bree: If you love into the story, then please share it with a friend that is the best way to support this podcast. And thanks.

[00:02:19] Bree: Before we get into Jaclyn’s story. Let’s look at five words and expressions that she uses.

[00:02:26] The first one is two and up. So if you end up somewhere, it means that you arrive at a particular place, or find yourself in a situation, often one that you didn’t plan.

[00:02:45] For example, after getting lost, we ended up at a beautiful beach by accident. Or she ended up working late because a big project came up, unexpectedly.

[00:03:00] Next slope. S L O P E. So a slope is a surface that is higher on one side and lower on the other, like a hill or a mountain or a ramp. It can also be used as a verb to describe something that inclines or tilts. For example, the children loved going down the snowy slope on the sled. Or the path slopes gently towards the river. A slope.

[00:03:34] Next to glide. To glide is to move slowly and continuously through the air. For example, the bird glided effortlessly across the sky. Barely moving its wings. Or the paraglider glided down to the landing point, enjoying a smooth flight.

[00:04:00] Next To lift off. To lift off is to rise or take off from the ground. And this phrasal verb is especially used for rockets or planes or anything that comes off the ground vertically.

[00:04:21] For example, the rocket lifted off successfully heading towards space. Or at the helicopter lifted off, rising straight up into the air. And finally to fit in. To fit in is a phrasal verb. That means to feel comfortable and accepted in a group of people. Or it can also mean to have enough space for something or someone. For example, she fit in well with her colleagues at work and made friends quickly. Or the couch didn’t fit in the living room, so they had to move it to a larger room with more space.

[00:05:07] For an extended vocabulary list, a listening comprehension quiz and the transcript, you can visit our website into the story podcast.com. Okay, it’s my favorite time. Let’s get into the story.

[00:05:25] It’s 2003 and Jaclyn is standing on the edge of a mountain getting ready to jump. She starts running as fast as she can towards the ridge. As she runs, she can feel the weight of her paraglider on the ground behind her. And then, suddenly, she feels it come up off the ground. She’s flying.

[00:05:48] Jaclyn: During this time, I had a radio in my ear, and I was listening to the voice of my boyfriend. Chris Mueller, who is a, who was a very, uh, prominent paragliding pilot, and I was very new to it.

[00:06:03] I’d only been flying for about two years. Paragliding, flying, that’s what you call it.

[00:06:08] Bree: On that day, Jaclyn was learning to soar for the first time. Soaring is what birds do. A bird soars over the sea. In paragliding, soaring is a more complicated flying style that Jaclyn had never done before. Soaring involves the paraglider pilot using hot air currents to gain altitude and to stay in the sky longer.

[00:06:33] Jaclyn: So, today was my first time I was going to try soaring. Now, it was definitely a bit intimidating because on the launching pad, there was about 50 to 100 other pilots who were about to do a competition.

[00:06:47] Seeing as we still had an hour or two before the competition started, I was just going to go in the air and be a wind dummy, which means that the other pilots Would be able to get an idea of how the air is. Was it really bumpy? Was there, would the thermals take you high really quick? Or did you have to work really hard to catch those thermals to get high in the air?

[00:07:07] So I stood there listening to my boyfriend’s voice. And at that point he said, okay, you’re good to launch. So as hard as I can with my hands behind me, holding onto my brake lines, I just start running. The glider will catch the wind. And as I’m running, I see it coming higher above my head, and right before I’m about to take my feet off the ground, I look up to make sure the entire glider is open, and once I see it’s good to go, I keep going until it kicks me up in the air, and you just keep running, and eventually your feet lift off the ground.

[00:07:47] As I take off, I, when looking around, there wasn’t any other pilot in the air, it was a really clear day. Uh, then Chris came in the air and said, Okay, Jaclyn, everything’s looking good, I want you to look to your right and slowly start turning the glider. As you’re soaring, what you’re doing is turning circles and trying to see where you can find the hot air rising to take you higher in the air.

[00:08:08] Uh, I was very focused on his voice. I wasn’t maybe looking around as much as I should. I was just listening to him and where he was telling me to go. Kind of the same way you’d probably listen to your Google Maps in the car. You’re just sort of on autopilot listening. Maybe not, uh, really being aware of your surroundings because you’re in a new area.

[00:08:30] For me, I was in a new flying site. I’ve never been there.

[00:08:33] I had been in the air only a few minutes, and I was doing these circles, you know, to the right, and then again, I would go to the left to try and get higher in the air. I didn’t feel like I was ascending very fast, but I definitely was gaining altitude through my, uh, soaring.

[00:08:50] Chris was in the air, and I remember he, oh, I remember he was so excited, saying, You’re soaring! You’re doing it! How does it feel? And I was just focused on, just tell me where to go next.

[00:09:01] Bree: Everything seems under control. Jaclyn had successfully launched into the air, and now she was listening to Chris’s voice guiding her through her first soaring experience.

[00:09:14] Jaclyn: I was about 300 feet in the air from the launching site above the mountain. So that’s definitely not very high. as I was turning to the right and doing, completing another 360, catching a thermal. As I came around away from the mountain, I saw a flash of blue and I heard a whole bunch of fabric noises.

[00:09:36] It was a, and it was a very aggressive hit.

[00:09:42] I didn’t really realize that at the time what was happening, I thought that maybe I had had a wind collapse. I, there was a bunch, there was lines all in my face. There was a heavy weight on me. I looked down and I could see that there was a person, a pilot in a harness hanging below me, his parachute, as it swung around my lines, had completely collapsed and was hanging below him. And then out to the side of us was my parachute, which was half collapsed.

[00:10:12] Bree: Another pilot has collided with Jaclyn. His parachute has collapsed and he’s now hanging off her. The tangled pilots begin to fall from the sky at an increasingly fast pace. They are just 300 feet, about 90 meters, up in the air, which means they don’t have a lot of time to do something about the situation.

[00:10:36] Jaclyn: Now at this time, still not registering in my mind exactly what was going on, I heard Chris’s voice saying, Jaclyn, you’ve been in a midair collision. Listen to me. You’ve, we’ve practiced this, in which we had practiced this, because. Just two weeks prior to this day, I had done a clinic learning how to deploy a reserve parachute, so I was very calm.

[00:11:01] I knew exactly what happened. I looked down. I could see this other person hanging below me off my harness. I pulled out my parachute, and I held it next to my body for three minutes. a minute listening to Chris in my ear. Now, during this time, the glider slowly turning to the right and it’s accelerating in speed, which is, I was very close to, or had already begun, uh, to be locked into a spiral.

[00:11:28] Bree: Jaclyn is falling in spirals towards the ground. Chris is still giving her instructions. Jaclyn knows she needs to activate her reserve parachute by throwing it out to the side and grabbing the lines to open the parachute and hopefully slow their fall.

[00:11:47] Jaclyn: I started slowly descending, but it’s not an immediate fall. I could tell that the ground was coming up faster, but I wasn’t paying attention to that at the moment. I could see treetops getting closer, but I was just focusing on holding out my glider and then finding a place where my lines and my paraglider or this other pilot who was attached to me wasn’t in the way.

[00:12:05] So at this time I took the glider, I threw it out to the left side. I threw it as far as I could. And then I grabbed onto the lines as it, as it was flying out and I pulled them in as fast as I could to try and get air into this glider. So you can activate it and have it stop your fall. As I was flying out, it was, it didn’t activate right away.

[00:12:27] I kept having to pull the lines and pull the lines, but because our, our spiral was starting to accelerate so fast, eventually it did engage. And, uh, I heard the very loudest go pop and the whole thing just pops open. And very quickly, we both, myself and the pilot below me stopped. And then instantly, as soon as that popped, there was only about one second we hit the treetops.

[00:12:53] And then, when you hit the trees, you fell, I fell through the trees and through the branches, and then we both hit the ground.

[00:13:01] Bree: The parachute opens just in time, slowing down Jaclyn’s fall. This means that both her and the other pilot crash into the trees, but the impact is not nearly as violent as it could have been.

[00:13:14] Jaclyn: In my ear, I heard Chris. He said, Jaclyn, don’t move. I saw where you landed. We’re all coming to you. And at that point, I sat up and I looked over to this uh, other pilot. He popped his head up. All I could see was a big mess of long blonde curls and hair. And I said, are you okay? And he looked at me and said, I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry. I didn’t really, you know, understand why he was apologizing. I was just focused on what happened. Are you hurt? Are you, do you need any help? So we were just kind of doing a, a checklist of how we were feeling. We were looking at our arms during this time, looking at our legs, looking at our scratches, getting out of our harness, unclipping, standing up, moving around, and just, you know, trying to gauge how we were, could not believe no one, neither of us had a broken bone.

[00:14:05] After the accident there was, Chris was feeling, I remember he was feeling very guilty that it happened, probably because he also wanted me to enjoy it. And for the two years that I had done it, I didn’t really know if I ever liked it. Uh, there was a lot of time you spent at the top of the hill, just waiting, watching other pilots launching. Then it was too windy, or, you know, there was no wind at all, and you would go right back to the landing pad right after you launched and weren’t able to get any thermals. I just found it, it was very time-consuming, and I was really trying hard to enjoy it. Paragliding, because paragliding was his life.

[00:14:39] He ran a flying school. This is, he taught people how to do this. This was his career. And so I really had to fit in and really had to enjoy this to be part of his life. And, uh, after the accident, I really realized it. There is nothing I like about it, and I don’t want to do it again.

[00:15:02] Bree: Jaclyn and Chris broke up not long after her accident, and I’m very sad to tell you that he died in 2005. He was passionate about flying and died doing what he loved.

[00:15:20] I want to say a big thank you to my sister, Jaclyn for sharing this story. I’ve heard it many times before, but it was different to hear it for the podcast. I don’t think I really understood before now how much this accident actually changed her life. It’s a story that shows us how life’s twists can actually shape us forever.

[00:15:45] Visit into the story podcast.com to see a photo of Jaclyn and Chris.

[00:15:53] Okay folks, if you’re loving this podcast, you’ll definitely enjoy my newsletter too. Every few weeks. I’ll send you a quick email with practical tips and fascinating topics from the world of psychology. And ways to make your life better. Just head over to, into the story podcast.com. And click subscribe. It’s completely free.

[00:16:18] Okay. That’s all for today. Until the next episode, I hope that you have a good time or at least a good story to tell.

[00:00:27] Hi there. It’s your host Bree today, we’re going into this story. Of Jaclyn St. Louis. Jaclyn is from Calgary in Western Canada. And Calgary also happens to be my hometown, not coincidentally because Jaclyn is my big sister.

[00:01:12] Calgary is a great place for paragliding. It’s near the Rocky mountains. So there are many flying spots. There’s also a beautiful views and a really nice community of paragliders. on this episode,

[00:01:30] Jaclyn is going to tell us about the day she was in a paragliding accident.

[00:01:37] Jaclyn: Jaclyn, you’ve been in a midair collision. Listen to me. You’ve, we’ve practiced this,

[00:01:44] Bree: Jaclyn had been introduced to paragliding by her boyfriend at the time. Chris Mueller, a pro pilot with tons of experience. Today she shares the detailed technique of her flight. With Chris guiding her every step. Everything was going smoothly. Until suddenly it wasn’t.

[00:02:08] Bree: If you love into the story, then please share it with a friend that is the best way to support this podcast. And thanks.

[00:02:19] Bree: Before we get into Jaclyn’s story. Let’s look at five words and expressions that she uses.

[00:02:26] The first one is two and up. So if you end up somewhere, it means that you arrive at a particular place, or find yourself in a situation, often one that you didn’t plan.

[00:02:45] For example, after getting lost, we ended up at a beautiful beach by accident. Or she ended up working late because a big project came up, unexpectedly.

[00:03:00] Next slope. S L O P E. So a slope is a surface that is higher on one side and lower on the other, like a hill or a mountain or a ramp. It can also be used as a verb to describe something that inclines or tilts. For example, the children loved going down the snowy slope on the sled. Or the path slopes gently towards the river. A slope.

[00:03:34] Next to glide. To glide is to move slowly and continuously through the air. For example, the bird glided effortlessly across the sky. Barely moving its wings. Or the paraglider glided down to the landing point, enjoying a smooth flight.

[00:04:00] Next To lift off. To lift off is to rise or take off from the ground. And this phrasal verb is especially used for rockets or planes or anything that comes off the ground vertically.

[00:04:21] For example, the rocket lifted off successfully heading towards space. Or at the helicopter lifted off, rising straight up into the air. And finally to fit in. To fit in is a phrasal verb. That means to feel comfortable and accepted in a group of people. Or it can also mean to have enough space for something or someone. For example, she fit in well with her colleagues at work and made friends quickly. Or the couch didn’t fit in the living room, so they had to move it to a larger room with more space.

[00:05:07] For an extended vocabulary list, a listening comprehension quiz and the transcript, you can visit our website into the story podcast.com. Okay, it’s my favorite time. Let’s get into the story.

[00:05:25] It’s 2003 and Jaclyn is standing on the edge of a mountain getting ready to jump. She starts running as fast as she can towards the ridge. As she runs, she can feel the weight of her paraglider on the ground behind her. And then, suddenly, she feels it come up off the ground. She’s flying.

[00:05:48] Jaclyn: During this time, I had a radio in my ear, and I was listening to the voice of my boyfriend. Chris Mueller, who is a, who was a very, uh, prominent paragliding pilot, and I was very new to it.

[00:06:03] I’d only been flying for about two years. Paragliding, flying, that’s what you call it.

[00:06:08] Bree: On that day, Jaclyn was learning to soar for the first time. Soaring is what birds do. A bird soars over the sea. In paragliding, soaring is a more complicated flying style that Jaclyn had never done before. Soaring involves the paraglider pilot using hot air currents to gain altitude and to stay in the sky longer.

[00:06:33] Jaclyn: So, today was my first time I was going to try soaring. Now, it was definitely a bit intimidating because on the launching pad, there was about 50 to 100 other pilots who were about to do a competition.

[00:06:47] Seeing as we still had an hour or two before the competition started, I was just going to go in the air and be a wind dummy, which means that the other pilots Would be able to get an idea of how the air is. Was it really bumpy? Was there, would the thermals take you high really quick? Or did you have to work really hard to catch those thermals to get high in the air?

[00:07:07] So I stood there listening to my boyfriend’s voice. And at that point he said, okay, you’re good to launch. So as hard as I can with my hands behind me, holding onto my brake lines, I just start running. The glider will catch the wind. And as I’m running, I see it coming higher above my head, and right before I’m about to take my feet off the ground, I look up to make sure the entire glider is open, and once I see it’s good to go, I keep going until it kicks me up in the air, and you just keep running, and eventually your feet lift off the ground.

[00:07:47] As I take off, I, when looking around, there wasn’t any other pilot in the air, it was a really clear day. Uh, then Chris came in the air and said, Okay, Jaclyn, everything’s looking good, I want you to look to your right and slowly start turning the glider. As you’re soaring, what you’re doing is turning circles and trying to see where you can find the hot air rising to take you higher in the air.

[00:08:08] Uh, I was very focused on his voice. I wasn’t maybe looking around as much as I should. I was just listening to him and where he was telling me to go. Kind of the same way you’d probably listen to your Google Maps in the car. You’re just sort of on autopilot listening. Maybe not, uh, really being aware of your surroundings because you’re in a new area.

[00:08:30] For me, I was in a new flying site. I’ve never been there.

[00:08:33] I had been in the air only a few minutes, and I was doing these circles, you know, to the right, and then again, I would go to the left to try and get higher in the air. I didn’t feel like I was ascending very fast, but I definitely was gaining altitude through my, uh, soaring.

[00:08:50] Chris was in the air, and I remember he, oh, I remember he was so excited, saying, You’re soaring! You’re doing it! How does it feel? And I was just focused on, just tell me where to go next.

[00:09:01] Bree: Everything seems under control. Jaclyn had successfully launched into the air, and now she was listening to Chris’s voice guiding her through her first soaring experience.

[00:09:14] Jaclyn: I was about 300 feet in the air from the launching site above the mountain. So that’s definitely not very high. as I was turning to the right and doing, completing another 360, catching a thermal. As I came around away from the mountain, I saw a flash of blue and I heard a whole bunch of fabric noises.

[00:09:36] It was a, and it was a very aggressive hit.

[00:09:42] I didn’t really realize that at the time what was happening, I thought that maybe I had had a wind collapse. I, there was a bunch, there was lines all in my face. There was a heavy weight on me. I looked down and I could see that there was a person, a pilot in a harness hanging below me, his parachute, as it swung around my lines, had completely collapsed and was hanging below him. And then out to the side of us was my parachute, which was half collapsed.

[00:10:12] Bree: Another pilot has collided with Jaclyn. His parachute has collapsed and he’s now hanging off her. The tangled pilots begin to fall from the sky at an increasingly fast pace. They are just 300 feet, about 90 meters, up in the air, which means they don’t have a lot of time to do something about the situation.

[00:10:36] Jaclyn: Now at this time, still not registering in my mind exactly what was going on, I heard Chris’s voice saying, Jaclyn, you’ve been in a midair collision. Listen to me. You’ve, we’ve practiced this, in which we had practiced this, because. Just two weeks prior to this day, I had done a clinic learning how to deploy a reserve parachute, so I was very calm.

[00:11:01] I knew exactly what happened. I looked down. I could see this other person hanging below me off my harness. I pulled out my parachute, and I held it next to my body for three minutes. a minute listening to Chris in my ear. Now, during this time, the glider slowly turning to the right and it’s accelerating in speed, which is, I was very close to, or had already begun, uh, to be locked into a spiral.

[00:11:28] Bree: Jaclyn is falling in spirals towards the ground. Chris is still giving her instructions. Jaclyn knows she needs to activate her reserve parachute by throwing it out to the side and grabbing the lines to open the parachute and hopefully slow their fall.

[00:11:47] Jaclyn: I started slowly descending, but it’s not an immediate fall. I could tell that the ground was coming up faster, but I wasn’t paying attention to that at the moment. I could see treetops getting closer, but I was just focusing on holding out my glider and then finding a place where my lines and my paraglider or this other pilot who was attached to me wasn’t in the way.

[00:12:05] So at this time I took the glider, I threw it out to the left side. I threw it as far as I could. And then I grabbed onto the lines as it, as it was flying out and I pulled them in as fast as I could to try and get air into this glider. So you can activate it and have it stop your fall. As I was flying out, it was, it didn’t activate right away.

[00:12:27] I kept having to pull the lines and pull the lines, but because our, our spiral was starting to accelerate so fast, eventually it did engage. And, uh, I heard the very loudest go pop and the whole thing just pops open. And very quickly, we both, myself and the pilot below me stopped. And then instantly, as soon as that popped, there was only about one second we hit the treetops.

[00:12:53] And then, when you hit the trees, you fell, I fell through the trees and through the branches, and then we both hit the ground.

[00:13:01] Bree: The parachute opens just in time, slowing down Jaclyn’s fall. This means that both her and the other pilot crash into the trees, but the impact is not nearly as violent as it could have been.

[00:13:14] Jaclyn: In my ear, I heard Chris. He said, Jaclyn, don’t move. I saw where you landed. We’re all coming to you. And at that point, I sat up and I looked over to this uh, other pilot. He popped his head up. All I could see was a big mess of long blonde curls and hair. And I said, are you okay? And he looked at me and said, I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry. I’m so sorry. I didn’t really, you know, understand why he was apologizing. I was just focused on what happened. Are you hurt? Are you, do you need any help? So we were just kind of doing a, a checklist of how we were feeling. We were looking at our arms during this time, looking at our legs, looking at our scratches, getting out of our harness, unclipping, standing up, moving around, and just, you know, trying to gauge how we were, could not believe no one, neither of us had a broken bone.

[00:14:05] After the accident there was, Chris was feeling, I remember he was feeling very guilty that it happened, probably because he also wanted me to enjoy it. And for the two years that I had done it, I didn’t really know if I ever liked it. Uh, there was a lot of time you spent at the top of the hill, just waiting, watching other pilots launching. Then it was too windy, or, you know, there was no wind at all, and you would go right back to the landing pad right after you launched and weren’t able to get any thermals. I just found it, it was very time-consuming, and I was really trying hard to enjoy it. Paragliding, because paragliding was his life.

[00:14:39] He ran a flying school. This is, he taught people how to do this. This was his career. And so I really had to fit in and really had to enjoy this to be part of his life. And, uh, after the accident, I really realized it. There is nothing I like about it, and I don’t want to do it again.

[00:15:02] Bree: Jaclyn and Chris broke up not long after her accident, and I’m very sad to tell you that he died in 2005. He was passionate about flying and died doing what he loved.

[00:15:20] I want to say a big thank you to my sister, Jaclyn for sharing this story. I’ve heard it many times before, but it was different to hear it for the podcast. I don’t think I really understood before now how much this accident actually changed her life. It’s a story that shows us how life’s twists can actually shape us forever.

[00:15:45] Visit into the story podcast.com to see a photo of Jaclyn and Chris.

[00:15:53] Okay folks, if you’re loving this podcast, you’ll definitely enjoy my newsletter too. Every few weeks. I’ll send you a quick email with practical tips and fascinating topics from the world of psychology. And ways to make your life better. Just head over to, into the story podcast.com. And click subscribe. It’s completely free.

[00:16:18] Okay. That’s all for today. Until the next episode, I hope that you have a good time or at least a good story to tell.

Episode's vocabulary List

*vocabulary featured in podcast

RIDGE: A long narrow hilltop or mountain range. Examples: “They hiked along the ridge, enjoying the views on both sides.” or “The house was built on a ridge overlooking the valley.”

 

*TO LIFT OFF: To take off from the ground in a vertical direction. Examples: “The rocket lifted off successfully, heading towards space.” or “The helicopter lifted off from the helipad.”

 

*TO GLIDE: To move smoothly through the air. Examples: “The eagle glided gracefully across the sky.” or “The paraglider glided gently to the ground.”

 

BUMPY: An uneven surface or an experience involving sudden movements. Examples: “The road was bumpy, making the ride uncomfortable.” or “The flight was bumpy due to turbulence.”

 

HARNESS: Straps or cords that attach someone to a vehicle or apparatus. Examples: “She put on her harness before climbing the rock wall.” or “The safety harness kept him secure during the ride.”

 

PARACHUTE: An apparatus that controls the speed of a fall. Examples: “He opened his parachute and floated safely to the ground.” or “Skydivers rely on their parachutes to land safely.”

 

*TO END UP: To arrive at a destination or situation, perhaps unexpectedly. Examples: “After taking the wrong turn, we ended up at a beautiful lake.” or “She ended up becoming a doctor, even though she studied engineering.”

 

TO GAUGE: To estimate or determine the amount or dimensions of something. Examples: “He used a ruler to gauge the length of the table.” or “It’s hard to gauge how much food we will need for the party.”

 

TO GRAB: To take hold of something suddenly with your hands. Examples: “She grabbed her coat and ran out the door.” or “He grabbed the rope to stop himself from falling.”

 

*TO FIT IN: To be comfortable with a group of people or to have enough space for something. Examples: “He quickly fit in with his new classmates.” or “The sofa didn’t fit in the small living room.”

 

*SLOPE: A surface where one side is higher than the other. Examples: “The children enjoyed skiing down the slope.” or “The road slopes down towards the river.”

 

LANDING PAD: A specific area on the ground where a flying vehicle or person can land safely. Examples: “The helicopter landed smoothly on the landing pad.” or “Skydivers aim for the landing pad to ensure a safe descent.”

*vocabulary featured in podcast

RIDGE: A long narrow hilltop or mountain range. Examples: “They hiked along the ridge, enjoying the views on both sides.” or “The house was built on a ridge overlooking the valley.”

 

*TO LIFT OFF: To take off from the ground in a vertical direction. Examples: “The rocket lifted off successfully, heading towards space.” or “The helicopter lifted off from the helipad.”

 

*TO GLIDE: To move smoothly through the air. Examples: “The eagle glided gracefully across the sky.” or “The paraglider glided gently to the ground.”

 

BUMPY: An uneven surface or an experience involving sudden movements. Examples: “The road was bumpy, making the ride uncomfortable.” or “The flight was bumpy due to turbulence.”

 

HARNESS: Straps or cords that attach someone to a vehicle or apparatus. Examples: “She put on her harness before climbing the rock wall.” or “The safety harness kept him secure during the ride.”

 

PARACHUTE: An apparatus that controls the speed of a fall. Examples: “He opened his parachute and floated safely to the ground.” or “Skydivers rely on their parachutes to land safely.”

 

*TO END UP: To arrive at a destination or situation, perhaps unexpectedly. Examples: “After taking the wrong turn, we ended up at a beautiful lake.” or “She ended up becoming a doctor, even though she studied engineering.”

 

TO GAUGE: To estimate or determine the amount or dimensions of something. Examples: “He used a ruler to gauge the length of the table.” or “It’s hard to gauge how much food we will need for the party.”

 

TO GRAB: To take hold of something suddenly with your hands. Examples: “She grabbed her coat and ran out the door.” or “He grabbed the rope to stop himself from falling.”

 

*TO FIT IN: To be comfortable with a group of people or to have enough space for something. Examples: “He quickly fit in with his new classmates.” or “The sofa didn’t fit in the small living room.”

 

*SLOPE: A surface where one side is higher than the other. Examples: “The children enjoyed skiing down the slope.” or “The road slopes down towards the river.”

 

LANDING PAD: A specific area on the ground where a flying vehicle or person can land safely. Examples: “The helicopter landed smoothly on the landing pad.” or “Skydivers aim for the landing pad to ensure a safe descent.”

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More about Jaclyn St. Louis

Into the Story Podcast - EP 35 Jaclyn home inspector

Jaclyn is considered one of the top Home Inspectors in Canada 

When Jaclyn isn’t being Bree’s sister, you’ll probably find her on the TV news as an expert Home Inspector in Canada, riding her bike, or camping in the mountains with her kids and husband.

If you ever go to Calgary and you want to learn paragliding, visit Chris Muller’s flying school.

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